2016 draws to a close

With Christmas only days away and 2017 a little over a week away, it seems like 2016 has gone with in a blink of and eye.

We’re starting our wind down towards our annual break and are we looking forward to it I can tell you.

2016 has been an exciting year with things like the Colmic Soar Tackle team plus a few other individuals fishing for us in the Middy lake view tournaments both doing really well. Fishing with and against some of the best anglers in the country has been an amazing experience and what a great bunch.

So what is planned for 2017 well lots really. Why not come and join us with the Kings Head AC and get out on the banks for some light-hearted match fishing. From here we are also looking to bring new anglers through the ranks in to the Colmic team.

With late winter river matchs starting Jan 29th there are a few places left so be sure to get your name down.

June will see the annual Soar Tackle ‘A pint with friends’ road show and your going to love what we’ve got planned for 2017. All ready for the open river season, get your hands on some amazing kit, meet the pro’s ask the questions. In an amazing location see first hand how they actually set up and tackle the river Soar. Not to be missed, Watch out for future information.

We’ve new and exciting ranges coming to the shop and I’ve got to get my building head on to make some major changers in Jan / Feb.

Don’t forget to pop in to the shop on Christmas eve and have a beer and a few mince pies on us until 4pm.

With an exciting New Year a head we will be off on our holidays from the 30th Dec and back open on the 14th Jan.

Wishing you all a very happy Christmas and New Year

Scott & Kath

Pole Float Confusion?

Confused? It’s not surprising with the vast array of pole floats out there to temped you, and if your like me you just can’t help yourself. ‘you can never have enough floats’.

There are loads of ready-made rigs out there these day’s many of which are really good the Middy X5 range are some of the best I’ve used. But there’s nothing like making your own rigs up, tailoring a rig for a venue yourself then catching on it always add’s to my enjoyment.

So where to start, is there a float that covers all bases, what size of float, what do I need? these are some of the many questions you might ask yourself.

To start with I would ignore all these floats that say this is for corn this is for pellet and this is for meat. Yes some shapes are better for certain baits but it can get to confusing to start with. The only venue that shape is more important is rivers, but we’ll touch on this later.

So how do you select one float from another?

You can make things easier by looking at a floats make up and design so lets start there.

Pick up any pole float and they’ll all be a variation of a shape. round, pear, straight, and diamond. They will all tend to be made of balsa, nylon, plastic, cane and wire. All these variations make a float act and work in different ways. We could go well in to depth with this but lets start with some easy to use basics.

A round shape will give better stability than a straight stick shape. But a straight stick will give better bite detection than a round shape as there is less resistance. So you wouldn’t want to use a straight float on a flowing venue like a river or even a lake in the wind. I would stir clear of straight pole floats until your knowledge and confidence builds.

Float make up is important and also makes a difference in how the float works. I will go in to this in another chapter, but to start with stick to carbon stems balsa bodies and plastic or nylon tips.

So is there such a thing as an all-rounder that suits just about all venues like lakes ponds and slow to medium flow rivers?.

In sort yes there is, what you’re looking for is a round-bodied float or sort of rugby ball shape. The best stem to look for is a nice long carbon or nylon stem, the tip of the float wants to be either nylon or plastic.

The long carbon stem and plastic/nylon tip with give good stability in all sorts of conditions with all sorts of baits. Making it ideal for fishing up to 10ft deep, fish this float at full depth shirt button style as you’ll get a nice even fall on the hook bait.In bigger sizes from 1 gram up wards you can bulk shot to get your hook bait down, bulk shotting by grouping the shot together will work better in deep lakes or moving water.image

A 4×14 / 0.4 gram sized float will cover many still water venues from around 4ft to 5ft deep, any deeper than this I would go for a minimum of 4×16 / 1/ 2 gram float. Pushing 10ft I would be reaching for a 4×20 / 1 gram float. Rivers slow moving I wouldn’t go any smaller than 1.5 gram and I would bulk shot the float at around 3/4 depth.

For fishing up in the water or really shallow margin areas. Look for a round bodied float with a short nylon stem and nylon tip. Shot shirt button style the float will normally lay flat on the surface before slowly sitting up right as each shot sinks.image

Shotting pole floats can be difficult, the use of small shot far from helping. One of the best things you can get for setting up pole floats is a Dosapiombo. This simple little device has neutral buoyancy in water, all you to do is clip your chosen pole float in to the top and place in a jar of water that is deep enough to allow the float to sink to the correct depth. I use a glass vase as shown in the picture below.

Slowly add shot or styles to the Dosapiombo until the float sits in the water at the correct height. The table below will help give you a rough guide on which size shot to use. One thing to bearing mind it that tap water in denser than river or lake water so you may need to remove a weight once at your chosen venue.

Pole float size         Weight                    Equivalent in shot

3 x 10                         0.10g                          2 x No’10

4 x 10                          0.15g                          3 x No’9

4 x 12                          0.2g                            5 x No’10

4 x 14                          0.4g                            6 x No’8

4 x 16                          0.5g                            8 x No’8

4 x 18                          0.75g                          3 x No’3

4 x 20                          1g                                4 x No’3

5 x 20                          1.25g                           5 x No’3

6 x 20                          1.5g                             6 x No’3

All calculations are approximate

Want to know more, keep an eye out for the next chapter on Pole float confusion an in depth look.

Do your bit

It’s getting to that busy time of year with the sun out and longer day light hours more of us will be out on the banks, plus June see’s that the start of river season which is all good.

With the warmer weather and more anglers does bring it’s problems. More so for commercial fisheries, ponds and lakes. Oxygen levels will drop and the increase in angling pressure causes stress, plus we tend to move from one venue to another.

Well that’s what we do move from venue to venue so what’s the problem? We all use a net of some form whether Match angler or Carp angler, this includes landing nets keepnets unhooking mats cradles etc. They all come in to contact with the venues water vegetation and fingers crossed a fish or two. Every venue will have it’s own ecosystem which includes it’s own parasites and no to venues will be the same.

Our nets unhooking mats etc are there to help us anglers best look after the fish during landing nad returning our catch. But we can also be doing massive harm to every fish in that venue.

Why?

As a fishery owner myself I’ve seen the effects of a slight in balance in my venues ecosystem in the form of disease. How it was transferred I will never know could it of been an anglers net or bird life. I’m sure you will of heard of koi / carp herpes this just being one transferable nasty.

So where do I stand in all this how can I help I just going fishing?

Best and easiest thing all us anglers can do is looking after our nets and unhooking mats etc properly by cleaning them. You may think well I just put them in a stink bag and take them home then use the dip tank at the fishery to clean them. This is all well and good and you should follow the fishery rules and use a dip tank if they want you to. But in my view dip tanks are actually a waste of time. The solution needs to be changed very regularly for it to work properly and I’ve been to countless fisheries that it’s quite clear they’ve not changed their dip tank solution in a long time.

So lets a least do our bit plus it can help us to.

Starting with stink bag’s they are great for transferring your wet nets bag home but never just leave your nets in them. They will harvest bacteria on a massive scale, that’s what the smell is.

Once home wash your nets and or your unhooking mat weigh slings etc with your garden hose.Don’t us detergents though just clean water. Then hang every thing out to dry I use the wash line and sometimes one of our garden trees. image

Air drying and the UV in day light will help kill off all those nasties, I tend to leave mine out over night so they have a good 24 / 48 hr for mother nature to do her cleaning work. I’ll also clean my stink bag in the same way turning it in side out once hung up.

You’ll notice when you come to pack everything way again that horrible smell you get will either be completely gone or it will be barely noticeable. The added bonus to this no smell is its less attractive to the dread rodent problem.

So next time you’ve been out on the bank whether it be river canal lake pond or commercial please do your bit in keeping our fisheries healthy and wash and dry your all your nets unhooking mats etc ready for your next outing.