Noise on the bank!

You may know I’ve been fishing the Coventry canal league this winter in some not so great weather conditions.

After a week of snow and freezing temperatures the final round would be held on a frozen canal.

After a hard day I actually won the match over all with not a massive weight but not shy of 3lb.

Putting that to one side the conditions and how myself and other anglers actually caught from the seemingly impossible got me thinking and asking myself questions. How were we able to catch?

After all we hear people saying be quiet on the bank don’t splash feeders etc or you’ll spook fish off.

But hang on surely that has just been proved wrong. I’ve just fished a section with a dozen other anglers smashing the hell out of the frozen surface before fishing!.

Now the ice was a good 3 inch thick and it took most of us a good 45 minutes to break through enough to be able to fish.

The noise under the surface must of been deafening with repeated hammer blows all along the bank.

Swinging an icebreaker about means you can’t really go to far out roughly a top 5 or 6. Don’t forget this is a canal with not much more than 3ft of depth to it.

So hopefully I’m building a mental picture up for you.

So answer me this.

All in is called and after around 20 minutes I’m in to my first fish and I can see the angler to my right starting to catch to. But hadn’t we just spooked every fish off with in a mile of us?.

So are fish more inquisitive than we think, does the noise spook them off for only a short period of time only for them to return to find out what all the noise was?.

I like to think so, and by placing a small plate of food down there for them to find hopefully they’ll hang around.

Noise must play apart in fishing as in keeping it to a minimum. But I do think fish will come and investigate.

Maybe a new noise all day long will push fish away until it stops.

I seem to recall someone saying that they dropped a brick in to margins that spooked the fish but only for the them to return quite quickly to investigate.

Lots to think about and may a few experiments are needed.

Scott

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: